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Theses Doctoral

Fiber-optic probe and bulk-optics Spectral Domain Optical Coherence tomography systems for in vivo cochlear mechanics measurements

Lin, Nathan Ching

Acquiring the motions of the inner ear sensory tissues provides insight to how the cochlea works. For this purpose, Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) is an ideal tool as it has a penetration depth of several millimeters. SDOCT can not only image inside the cochlear partition, but also measure the sample structures’ simultaneous displacements. We customized a commercial Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for such functions and detailed the software and hardware steps so this powerful system could be more accessible to auditory researchers.
The cochlea is surrounded by bones and tissues, and damage to it would make it passive. For this reason, cochlear vibrometry measuring locations have been limited to either the basal or apical regions. That is why I fabricated a two-dimensional scanning SDOCT-based probe, to access more cochlear locations through a small hand-drilled hole. What is exciting about the probe is that an electrode can be attached to its side to acquire spatially and temporally coincident voltage and displacement data. This would help us better understand the cochlear mechano-electrical feedback process.
Lastly, I investigated how the SDPM-reported displacement could be influenced by its neighboring signals and demonstrated this signal competition phenomenon experimentally and theoretically.

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More About This Work

Academic Units
Electrical Engineering
Thesis Advisors
Olson, Elizabeth S.
Hendon, Christine P.
Degree
Ph.D., Columbia University
Published Here
June 4, 2019
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