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Factors associated with self-rated health among migrant workers: results from a population-based cross-sectional study in Almaty, Kazakhstan

Kumparatana, Pam; Cournos, Francine; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Rozental, Yelena; Gilbert, Louisa

Objectives

To determine factors associated with SRH among migrant workers in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

Methods

In 2007, 805 vendors were screened. Approximately half were eligible (n =450), defined as at least 18 years old, a worker/owner in a randomly selected stall, having traveled 2 + hours outside of Almaty within the past year, and being an internal/external migrant. 28 non-migrants were excluded, leaving 422 participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between SRH, mental health, and psychosocial problems.

Results

Approximately 46% reported having poor or fair SRH. Clinical depression (OR 0.859, 95% CI 0.342–2.154), alcohol problems (OR 1.169, 95% CI 0.527–2.593), and legal status (OR 0.995, 95% CI 0.806–1.229) were not significantly associated with SRH, nor was exposure to interpersonal violence among women (OR 1.554, 95% CI 0.703–3.435). After adjusting for key variables, only ethnicity and social support were found to be significantly protective against poor or fair SRH.

Conclusions

SRH was not a comprehensive health measure for these Central Asian migrant workers. More specific questions are needed to identify mental illness and interpersonal violence.

Geographic Areas

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Also Published In

Title
International Journal of Public Health
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-017-0944-y

More About This Work

Academic Units
Social Work
Psychiatry
Mailman School of Public Health
Published Here
August 25, 2017
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