Academic Commons

Articles

Insertable surgical imaging device with pan, tilt, zoom, and lighting

Hu, Tie; Allen, Peter K.; Hogle, Nancy J.; Fowler, Dennis

This paper describes work we have done in developing an insertable surgical imaging device with multiple degrees-of-freedom for minimally invasive surgery. The device is fully insertable into the abdomen using standard 12 mm trocars. It consists of a modular camera and lens system which has pan and tilt capability provided by 2 small DC servo motors. It also has its own integrated lighting system that is part of the camera assembly. Once the camera is inserted into the abdomen, the insertion port is available for additional tooling, motivating the idea of single port surgery. A third zoom axis has been designed for the camera as well, allowing close-up and far-away imaging of surgical sites with a single camera unit. In animal tests with the device we have performed surgical procedures including cholecystectomy, appendectomy, running (measuring) the bowel, suturing, and nephrectomy. The tests show that the new device is: (1) Easier and more intuitive to use than a standard laparoscope. (2) Joystick operation requires no specialized operator training. (3) Field of view and access to relevant regions of the body were superior to a standard laparoscope using a single port. (4) Time to perform procedures was better or equivalent to a standard laparoscope. We believe these insertable platforms will be an integral part of future surgical systems. The platforms can be used with tooling as well as imaging systems, allowing many surgical procedures to be done using such a platform.

Files

Also Published In

Title
Robotics and Automation, 2008, ICRA 2008, IEEE International Conference on date, 19-23 May, 2008
Publisher
IEEE
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2008.4543657

More About This Work

Academic Units
Computer Science
Published Here
October 31, 2012
Academic Commons provides global access to research and scholarship produced at Columbia University, Barnard College, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary and Jewish Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is managed by the Columbia University Libraries.