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Making Work Supports Work: A Picture of Low-wage Workers in America

Purmort, Jessica

Many full-time workers in the United States are unable to make ends meet. Government "work support" policies — benefit programs such as earned income tax credits, public health insurance, child care assistance, and SNAP/food stamps — can help some families close the gap between low earnings and the high cost of basic expenses. While federal government guidelines provide a framework for work support policies in the United States, there is wide variation in how these policies are implemented across states. This report analyzes the effectiveness of these policies. Findings from this report show that the current patchwork of state policies fails to ensure that workers are able to afford their families' basic living expenses, leaving a number of low-wage workers and their families without adequate support. A greater federal investment is needed to create a comprehensive work support system that is designed to encourage and reward employment as well as provide workers with enough resources to care for their families. Federal priorities should include addressing the high cost of basic needs with an increased investment in affordable child care, subsidized health insurance, and housing assistance as well as structuring the work support system to better support workers' advancement toward financial self-sufficiency.

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Academic Units
National Center for Children in Poverty
Publisher
National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University
Series
Making Work Supports Work Publications
Published Here
June 4, 2010
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