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Magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Carnian/Norian boundary interval from the Pizzo Mondello section (Sicani Mountains, Sicily)

Muttoni, Giovanni; Kent, Dennis V.; Di Stefano, P.; Gullo, M.; Nicora, Alda; Tait, J.; Lowrie, William

The 146.5 m-thick Upper Triassic limestone section at Pizzo Mondello in the Sicani Mountains of western Sicily is characterized by high quality of exposure, accessibility, and stratigraphic continuity. Magnetostratigraphic results delineate 12 normal and reverse polarity magnetozones, labelled successively from the base upwards as PM1n, PM1r, PM6n, PM6r. The Carnian/Norian boundary, based on conodont biostratigraphy, falls somewhere in the PM3n to PM5n interval which corresponds to the E14n to E16n magnetozone interval in the Newark reference sequence of polarity reversals. Comparison of magnetobiostratigraphic data from the Newark basin, Pizzo Mondello and other Late Triassic marine sections available from the literature suggests the existence of a reduction in sedimentation rate in the Tethyan marine domain at around the Carnian/Norian boundary. Although the Newark and the expanded Pizzo Mondello sections correlate well with each other, correlation with the condensed Kavur Tepe and Scheiblkogel sections is unsatisfactory. A re-interpretation of the Kavur Tepe results suggests that the section is younger than its previous correlation with the Newark section, and that it was deposited in the northern instead of the southern hemisphere. Most of the condensed Tethyan marine sections are seen to be highly discontinuous, as evidenced by concantenated conodont total range zones.

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Title
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/S0031-0182(00)00224-8

More About This Work

Academic Units
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Published Here
January 13, 2012
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