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Longitudinal Medication Usage in Alzheimer Disease Patients

Zhu, Carolyn W.; Livote, Elayne E.; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Albert, Marilyn; Brandt, Jason; Blacker, Deborah; Sano, Mary; Stern, Yaakov

This study examined in detail patterns of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) and memantine use and explored the relationship between patient characteristics and such use. Patients with probable Alzheimer disease AD (n=201) were recruited from the Predictors Study in 3 academic AD centers and followed from early disease stages for up to 6 years. Random effects logistic regressions were used to examine effects of patient characteristics on ChEIs/memantine use over time. Independent variables included measures of function, cognition, comorbidities, the presence of extrapyramidal signs, psychotic symptoms, age, sex, and patient's living situation at each interval. Control variables included assessment interval, year of study entry, and site. During a 6-year study period, rate of ChEIs use decreased (80.6% to 73.0%) whereas memantine use increased (2.0% to 45.9%). Random effects logistic regression analyses showed that ChEI use was associated with better function, no psychotic symptoms, and younger age. Memantine use was associated with better function, poorer cognition, living at home, later assessment interval, and later year of study entry. Results suggest that high rate of ChEI use and increasing memantine use over time are consistent with current practice guidelines of initiation of ChEIs in mild-to-moderate AD patients and initiation of memantine in moderate-to-severe patients.

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Also Published In

Title
Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1097/WAD.0b013e3181e6a17a

More About This Work

Academic Units
Neurology
Published Here
February 23, 2018
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