Academic Commons

Chapters (Layout Features)

Indigenous Self-Determination and Political Rights: Practical Recommendations for Truth Commissions

Arthur, Paige

Truth commissions and commissions of inquiry are not new for Indigenous Peoples. In Guatemala, Peru, Australia, Chile, and Canada, Indigenous Peoples have been consulted, given statements, read reports, and more. Yet the larger question for Indigenous Peoples must be: how can a truth commission advance their longer-term vision of self-determination and full exercise of their political rights? Can a truth commission even make a difference on these issues? A truth commission cannot lead to self-determination by itself. But it may be part of a longer-term process leading in that direction. In order to contribute, however, they may need to operate a bit differently than in the past.

Geographic Areas

Files

Also Published In

Title
Indigenous Peoples’ Access To Justice, Including Truth And Reconciliation Processes
Publisher
Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University

More About This Work

Academic Units
Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Published Here
March 26, 2015

Notes

This is a chapter from "Indigenous Peoples’ Access to Justice, Including Truth and Reconciliation Processes". The entire volume is available in Academic Commons at http://dx.doi.org/10.7916/D8GT5M1F

Academic Commons provides global access to research and scholarship produced at Columbia University, Barnard College, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary and Jewish Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is managed by the Columbia University Libraries.