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Prescription opioid use disorder and heroin use among 12-34 year-olds in the United States from 2002 to 2014

Martins, Silvia S.; Segura, Luis Esteban; Santaella Tenorio, Julian; Perlmutter, Alexander S.; Fenton, Miriam C.; Cerdá, Magdalena; Keyes, Katherine M.; Ghandour, Lilian A.; Storr, Carla L.; Hasin, Deborah S.

Trend analyses of prescription opioids in the U.S. indicate use, especially use of prescription opioids stronger than morphine, has more than doubled among adults since the early 1990's (Frenk, Porter, & Paulozzi, 2015). Prescription opioids, like Oxycontin®, are effective pharmacological treatments for acute and chronic pain (Fitzcharles and Shir, 2009 ; Gallagher and Rosenthal, 2008). When used as indicated, these medications can be an important component of pain management. However, their high abuse potential presents concerns regarding their nonmedical use, which can be defined as ‘use of a prescription opioid that was not prescribed, or taken for the experience or feeling it caused’ (SAMHSA, 2014). In the United States, nonmedical use of prescription opioids (NMPO) is increasingly recognized as a serious public health problem among adults (Blanco et al., 2007; Han et al., 2015 ; Huang et al., 2006). Nonmedical prescription drug use, specifically nonmedical use of prescription opioids, is also a growing problem in other countries such as Canada (Fischer et al., 2014 ; Fischer et al., 2013) and Australia (Degenhardt et al., 2006 ; Rintoul et al., 2011).

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Also Published In

Title
Addictive Behaviors
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.033

More About This Work

Academic Units
Epidemiology
Psychiatry
Published Here
April 19, 2017
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