Academic Commons

Articles

Randomized phase 2 trial of monthly vitamin D to prevent respiratory complications in children with sickle cell disease

Lee, Margaret T.; Kattan, Meyer; Fennoy, Ilene; Arpadi, Stephen M.; Miller, Rachel L.; Cremers, Serge; McMahon, Donald J.; Nieves, Jeri W.; Brittenham, Gary M.

In sickle cell disease, respiratory infection and asthma may lead to respiratory complications that are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Vitamin D has anti-infective and immunomodulatory effects that may decrease the risk for respiratory infections, asthma, and acute chest syndrome. We conducted a randomized double-blind active-controlled clinical trial to determine whether monthly oral vitamin D3 can reduce the rate of respiratory events in children with sickle cell disease. Seventy sickle cell subjects, ages 3-20 years, with baseline records of respiratory events over 1 year before randomization, underwent screening. Sixty-two subjects with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 5-60 ng/mL were randomly assigned to oral vitamin D3 (100 000 IU or 12 000 IU, n = 31 each) under observed administration once monthly for 2 years. The primary outcome was the annual rate of respiratory events (respiratory infection, asthma exacerbation, or acute chest syndrome) ascertained by the use of a validated questionnaire administered biweekly. Analysis included 62 children (mean age of 9.9 years, 52% female, and predominantly with homozygous HbS disease [87%]) with mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D of 14.3 ng/mL. The annual rates of respiratory events at baseline and intervention years 1 and 2 were 4.34 ± 0.35, 4.28 ± 0.36, and 1.49 ± 0.37 (high dose) and 3.91 ± 0.35, 3.34 ± 0.37, and 1.54 ± 0.37 (standard dose), respectively. In pediatric patients with sickle cell disease, 2-year monthly oral vitamin D3 was associated with a >50% reduction in the rate of respiratory illness during the second year (P = .0005), with similar decreases associated with high- and standard-dose treatment.

Files

Also Published In

More About This Work

Academic Units
Pediatrics
Epidemiology
Medicine
Published Here
December 10, 2018
Academic Commons provides global access to research and scholarship produced at Columbia University, Barnard College, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary and Jewish Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is managed by the Columbia University Libraries.