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Endothelial Activation Microparticles and Inflammation Status Improve with Exercise Training in African Americans

Babbitt, Dianne M.; Diaz, Keith; Feairheller, Deborah L.; Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Perkins, Amanda M.; Veerabhadrappa, Praveen; Williamson, Sheara T.; Kretzschmar, Jan; Ling, Chenyi; Lee, Hojun; Grimm, Heather; Thakkar, Sunny R.; Crabbe, Deborah L.; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Brown, Michael D.

African Americans have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the world which may emanate from their predisposition to heightened endothelial inflammation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 6-month aerobic exercise training (AEXT) intervention on the inflammatory biomarkers interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and endothelial microparticle (EMP) CD62E+ and endothelial function assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in African Americans. A secondary purpose was to evaluate whether changes in IL-10, IL-6, or CD62E+ EMPs predicted the change in FMD following the 6-month AEXT intervention. A pre-post design was employed with baseline evaluation including office blood pressure, FMD, fasting blood sampling, and graded exercise testing. Participants engaged in 6 months of AEXT. Following the AEXT intervention, all baseline tests were repeated. FMD significantly increased, CD62E+ EMPs and IL-6 significantly decreased, and IL-10 increased but not significantly following AEXT. Changes in inflammatory biomarkers did not significantly predict the change in FMD. The change in significantly predicted the change in IL-10. Based on these results, AEXT may be a viable, nonpharmacological method to improve inflammation status and endothelial function and thereby contribute to risk reduction for cardiovascular disease in African Americans.

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Also Published In

Title
International Journal of Hypertension
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/538017

More About This Work

Academic Units
Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health
Publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Published Here
June 9, 2016
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