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Post-surgical surveillance of locally advanced ileal carcinoids found by routine ileal intubation during screening colonoscopy: a case series

Ten Cate, Eileen; Wong, Leslie Ann; Groff, Walter; Miller, Aaron

Carcinoid tumors are the most common type of small bowel tumor, and the incidence is rising. The majority of small bowel carcinoid tumors arise within 60cm of the ileocecal valve. The addition of ileoscopy to screening colonoscopy can detect asymptomatic small bowel carcinoid tumors and improve long-term prognosis through early surgical resection. Ileoscopy is a brief procedure with a high success rate and minimal complications beyond those of colonoscopy. The use of ileoscopy during screening colonoscopy has led to an increase in the early-stage detection of locoregional small bowel carcinoid tumors that can be completely treated with surgery alone, and as such has improved long-term prognosis in these patients. Five asymptomatic Caucasian patients, 3 males and 2 females, from 53 to 70 years old (mean age, 60 years old), were diagnosed with locoregional ileal carcinoids during routine colonoscopy with ileoscopy. Since having an ileocolectomy and without adjuvant treatment, no patient has developed tumor recurrence over a follow-up period of one and half to 12 and a half years. The early detection of carcinoid tumors by ileoscopy during screening colonoscopy can lead to increased long-term survival in patients with locally invasive disease. The high success rate and brief duration of the procedure, in addition to the lack of associated morbidity and mortality suggest that with further studies, routine ileoscopy during colonoscopy may be promising in the diagnosis of small bowel carcinoid tumors.

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Also Published In

Title
Journal of Medical Case Reports
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/1752-1947-8-444

More About This Work

Academic Units
Surgery
Publisher
BioMed Central
Published Here
January 7, 2015
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