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Expression of HIV transgene aggravates kidney injury in diabetic mice

Mallipattu, Sandeep K.; Liu, Ruijie; Zhong, Yifei; Chen, Ed Y.; D’Agati, Vivette Denise; Kaufman, Lewis; Ma’ayan, Avi; Klotman, Paul E.; Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John C.

With the widespread use of combination antiretroviral agents, the incidence of HIV-associated nephropathy has decreased. Currently, HIV-infected patients live much longer and often suffer from comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that concurrent HIV infection and diabetes mellitus may have a synergistic effect on the incidence of chronic kidney disease. To address this, we determined whether HIV-1 transgene expression accelerates diabetic kidney injury using a diabetic HIV-1 transgenic (Tg26) murine model. Diabetes was initially induced with low-dose streptozotocin in both Tg26 and wild-type mice on a C57BL/6 background, which is resistant to classic HIV-associated nephropathy. Although diabetic nephropathy is minimally observed on the C57BL/6 background, diabetic Tg26 mice exhibited a significant increase in glomerular injury compared with nondiabetic Tg26 mice and diabetic wild-type mice. Validation of microarray gene expression analysis from isolated glomeruli showed a significant upregulation of proinflammatory pathways in diabetic Tg26 mice. Thus, our study found that expression of HIV-1 genes aggravates diabetic kidney disease.

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Title
Kidney International
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2012.445

More About This Work

Academic Units
Pathology and Cell Biology
Published Here
July 11, 2013
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