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Association of IGF-I Levels with Muscle Strength and Mobility in Older Women

Cappola, Anne R.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Wand, Gary S.; Volpato, Stefano; Fried, Linda P.

The functional consequences of the age-associated decline in IGF-I are unknown. We hypothesized that low IGF-I levels in older women would be associated with poor muscle strength and mobility. We assessed this question in a population representative of the full spectrum of health in the community, obtaining serum IGF-I levels from women aged 70–79 yr, enrolled in the Women’s Health and Aging Study I or II. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using 617 women with IGF-I levels drawn within 90 d of measurement of outcomes. After adjustment for age, there was an association between IGF-I and knee extensor strength (P = 0.004), but not anthropometry or other strength measures. We found a positive relationship between IGF-I levels and walking speed for IGF-I levels below 50 μg/liter (P < 0.001), but no relationship above this threshold. A decline in IGF-I level was associated with self-reported difficulty in mobility tasks. All findings were attenuated after multivariate adjustment. In summary, in a study population including frail and healthy older women, low IGF-I levels were associated with poor knee extensor muscle strength, slow walking speed, and self-reported difficulty with mobility tasks. These findings suggest a role for IGF-I in disability as well as a potential target population for interventions to raise IGF-I levels.

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Also Published In

Title
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

More About This Work

Academic Units
Epidemiology
Publisher
The Endocrine Society
Published Here
September 15, 2015
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