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Theses Master's

Integration of Bicycle Commuting to Public Transit in New York City

Han, Zhiyuan

In this thesis, the author is dedicated to exploring the bicycle commuting trend in New York City and discussing the integration of bike-share system to public transit modes. Rather than looking into the whole population of cyclists, the analysis focuses on the group using Citi Bike, the bike-share system in NYC, as a commuting tool. Determinants of Citi Bike usage is examined through bivariate and multivariate correlation analysis. Specifically, the thesis consists of 6 parts. Chapter 1 goes through an overview on the basic development of trend of bicycle commuting. Chapter 2 looked into a bunch of early studies researching on the determinants of cycling level and statistical analysis methods. Extra attention is paid to the discussion about what has been influencing the usage of bike-share system. Chapter 3 overall introduces the data sources and ideas about data preprocessing. Research question is raised and the basic hypothesis described. More importantly, the principle and techniques of the two major analysis in this study is explained in detail. Implementation process and findings of the major analysis, the temporal and spatial analysis as well as the correlation analysis, are discussed separately in Chapter 4 and Chapter 5. Eventually, Chapter 6 concludes on the findings and arguments the author has proposed through the whole study and raises some of the ideas for further studies.

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More About This Work

Academic Units
Urban Planning
Thesis Advisors
Freeman, Lance M.
Degree
M.S., Columbia University
Published Here
June 24, 2016
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