Academic Commons

Articles

Speech-activated Myoclonus Mimicking Stuttering in a Patient with Myoclonus–Dystonia Syndrome

Isaacs, David A.; Hedera, Peter

Background: Acquired neurogenic stuttering has been considered a fairly uncommon clinical occurrence; speech-activated myoclonus is a rare entity that can mimic stuttering and is caused by a wide array of etiologies.

Case Report: Here we report a patient with myoclonus–dystonia syndrome (MDS), due to an identified disease-causing mutation, who displayed speech-activated myoclonus mimicking stuttering.

Discussion: In MDS, myoclonus has only infrequently been reported to affect speech. This case further expands the spectrum of conditions causing the rare clinical phenomenon of speech-activated myoclonus.

Files

Also Published In

Title
Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements
DOI
https://doi.org/10.7916/D8J966FP

More About This Work

Academic Units
Center for Parkinson's Disease and Other Movement Disorders
Publisher
The Center for Digital Research and Scholarship
Published Here
November 3, 2016