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Performance Comparisons of MIMO Techniques with Application to WCDMA Systems

Li, Chuxiang; Wang, Xiaodong

Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication techniques have received great attention and gained significant development in recent years. In this paper, we analyze and compare the performances of different MIMO techniques. In particular, we compare the performance of three MIMO methods, namely, BLAST, STBC, and linear precoding/decoding. We provide both an analytical performance analysis in terms of the average receiver and simulation results in terms of the BER. Moreover, the applications of MIMO techniques in WCDMA systems are also considered in this study. Specifically, a subspace tracking algorithm and a quantized feedback scheme are introduced into the system to simplify implementation of the beamforming scheme. It is seen that the BLAST scheme can achieve the best performance in the high data rate transmission scenario; the beamforming scheme has better performance than the STBC strategies in the diversity transmission scenario; and the beamforming scheme can be effectively realized in WCDMA systems employing the subspace tracking and the quantized feedback approach.

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Also Published In

Title
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1155/S1110865704309029

More About This Work

Academic Units
Electrical Engineering
Publisher
Springer
Published Here
September 8, 2014
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