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Hippocampal Subregions Differentially Associate with Standardized Memory Tests

Brickman, Adam M.; Stern, Yaakov; Small, Scott A.

Recent studies suggest that individual hippocampal subregions perform distinct cognitive operations and are differentially targeted by aging and disease. Although originally developed to assess global hippocampal function, whether performance on standard memory tests used in neuropsychological batteries is associated with individual hippocampal subregions remains unknown. Here we addressed this issue by imaging 210 neuropsychologically characterized subjects using a high-resolution variant of functional magnetic resonance imaging that generates maps reflective of basal hippocampal metabolism. Regression analysis revealed memory tests that differentially associate with two hippocampal subregions, the entorhinal cortex (EC) and the dentate gyrus (DG). Whereas performance on the delayed retention component of the Selective Reminding Test was associated with the EC, performance on the recognition component of the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) was associated with the DG. Furthermore, elevation in blood glucose, previously shown to target the DG, was found to correlate selectively with the recognition component of the BVRT. These findings provide further evidence that the hippocampal subregions perform distinct roles, and, interpreted in the context of previous neuropsychological and imaging studies, confirm that aging and Alzheimer's disease target different hippocampal subregions.

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Also Published In

Title
Hippocampus
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1002/hipo.20840

More About This Work

Academic Units
Neurology
Published Here
February 23, 2018
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