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Human Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells Are Defined by Core Transcriptional and Functional Signatures in Lymphoid and Mucosal Sites

Kumar, Brahma Vencel; Ma, Wenji; Miron, Michelle; Granot, Tomer; Guyer, Rebecca S.; Carpenter, Dustin; Senda, Takashi; Sun, Xiaoyun; Ho, Siu-Hong; Lerner, Harvey; Friedman, Amy L.; Shen, Yufeng; Farber, Donna L.

Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRMs) in mice mediate optimal protective immunity to infection and vaccination, while in humans, the existence and properties of TRMs remain unclear. Here, we use a unique human tissue resource to determine whether human tissue memory T cells constitute a distinct subset in diverse mucosal and lymphoid tissues. We identify a core transcriptional profile within the CD69+ subset of memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in lung and spleen that is distinct from that of CD69− TEM cells in tissues and circulation and defines human TRMs based on homology to the transcriptional profile of mouse CD8+ TRMs. Human TRMs in diverse sites exhibit increased expression of adhesion and inhibitory molecules, produce both pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, and have reduced turnover compared with circulating TEM, suggesting unique adaptations for in situ immunity. Together, our results provide a unifying signature for human TRM and a blueprint for designing tissue-targeted immunotherapies.

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Academic Units
Systems Biology
Microbiology and Immunology
Surgery
Medicine
Published Here
March 6, 2018