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Intravenous Immunoglobulin for Hypogammaglobulinemia after Lung Transplantation: A Randomized Crossover Trial

Lederer, David J.; Philip, Nisha; Rybak, Debbie; Arcasoy, Selim; Kawut, Steven M.

Background

We aimed to determine the effects of treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin on bacterial infections in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia (HGG) after lung transplantation.

Methods

We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled two-period crossover trial of immune globulin intravenous (IVIG), 10% Purified (Gamunex, Bayer, Elkhart, IN) monthly in eleven adults who had undergone lung transplantation more than three months previously. We randomized study participants to three doses of IVIG (or 0.1% albumin solution (placebo)) given four weeks apart followed by a twelve week washout and then three doses of placebo (or IVIG). The primary outcome was the number of bacterial infections within each treatment period.

Results

IVIG had no effect on the number of bacterial infections during the treatment period (3 during IVIG and 1 during placebo; odds ratio 3.5, 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 27.6, p = 0.24). There were no effects on other infections, use of antibiotics, or lung function. IVIG significantly increased trough IgG levels at all time points (least square means, 765.3 mg/dl during IVIG and 486.3 mg/dl during placebo, p<0.001). Four serious adverse events (resulting in hospitalization) occurred during the treatment periods (3 during active treatment and 1 during the placebo period, p = 0.37). Chills, flushing, and nausea occurred during one infusion of IVIG.

Conclusions

Treatment with IVIG did not reduce the short-term risk of bacterial infection in patients with HGG after lung transplantation. The clinical efficacy of immunoglobulin supplementation in HGG related to lung transplantation over the long term or with recurrent infections is unknown.

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Academic Units
Medicine
Obstetrics and Gynecology
Published Here
October 7, 2016
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