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Objectively Measured Adherence to Physical Activity Guidelines After Acute Coronary Syndrome

Kronish, Ian M.; Diaz, Keith; Goldsmith, Jeff; Moise, Nathalie; Schwartz, Joseph E.

Physical activity is a cornerstone of secondary prevention after acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Guidelines strongly recommend that post-ACS patients achieve ≥30 min of moderate aerobic activity such as brisk walking on at least 5 days per week within 2 weeks of discharge (1). Yet, little is known about the extent to which post-ACS patients are meeting physical activity guidelines. Prior studies assessing physical activity after ACS were limited by reliance on self-reports (2). The purpose of this study was to use an objective measure of physical activity to describe the proportion of ACS patients following physical activity recommendations in the high-risk post-discharge period.

Between 2009 and 2012, we enrolled patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction (MI) or unstable angina into the PULSE (Prescription Use, Lifestyle, and Stress Evaluation) study. Some patients participated in an ancillary study in which they were provided with an Actical accelerometer (Philips Respironics, Bend, Oregon) at or soon after discharge (3). Patients were asked to continuously wear the device on their nondominant wrist and to return the device 1 month later. All patients provided informed consent. The institutional review board of Columbia University Medical Center approved the study.

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Also Published In

Title
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2016.10.087

More About This Work

Academic Units
Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health
Biostatistics
Published Here
March 24, 2018
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