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Patterns of drug use and HIV infection among adults in a nationally representative sample

Shiau, Stephanie; Arpadi, Stephen M.; Yin, Michael T.; Martins, Silvia S.

Background: Little is known about drug use patterns among people living with HIV in comparison to an uninfected group in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between legal and illegal drug use and HIV infection in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Methods: Public use data files (2005–2014) from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) were used. Respondents were asked whether a medical professional had ever told them that they had HIV/AIDS. Ever (lifetime), past-year, and past month use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, and nonmedical use of psychotherapeutics was assessed. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) of the relationship between drug use and HIV infection, adjusting for demographics. Results: Of 377,787 respondents age 18 and older, 548 (0.19%) were categorized as HIV-infected. Ever use of cigarettes, tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, and psychotherapeutics was higher in HIV-infected individuals compared to HIV-uninfected individuals after adjustment for sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, total family income, and marital status. Past year and past month use was also higher for HIV-infected individuals for all substances aside from alcohol. Conclusions: In a nationally representative sample, there are higher levels of drug use and DSM-IV dependence among the HIV-infected population compared to the HIV-uninfected population. This is of concern because drug use and dependence can impede engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

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Also Published In

Title
Addictive Behaviors
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.01.015

More About This Work

Academic Units
Epidemiology
Medicine
Published Here
April 19, 2017
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