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Does Pramipexole Treatment Improve Headache in Patients with Concomitant Migraine and Restless Legs Syndrome?

Suzuki, Keisuke; Suzuki, Shiho; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Numao, Ayaka; Watanabe, Yuka; Takashima, Ryotaro; Hirata, Koichi

Background: Recent studies have suggested a strong link between migraines and restless legs syndrome (RLS). It is possible that these disorders share a dopaminergic dysfunction in the hypothalamic A11 nucleus that contributes to this association. However, there have been no clinical studies to evaluate the effect of dopaminergic treatment on migraine symptoms in patients with concomitant migraines and RLS.
Methods: We present an illustrative patient with concomitant RLS and migraine who showed improvement in her headache frequency and RLS symptoms following immediate‐release pramipexole (P‐IR) treatment and provide review results from the medical records of patients who experienced both migraines and RLS in our previous cross‐sectional study.
Results: Ten patients (nine patients from the previously completed single‐center study) received P‐IR treatment were included in the study. RLS symptoms improved markedly in all of the subjects. Five out of the 10 patients (50%) reported improvement in migraine headaches. Of these five patients, four (80%) had reported morning headaches before P‐IR treatment.
Discussion: Our results indicate that the identification of RLS in migraine patients is clinically significant and that dopaminergic treatment may improve both migraines, particularly morning headache (80% improvement in this study), and RLS symptoms. However, further clinical studies are warranted to verify our results.

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Title
Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movements

More About This Work

Academic Units
Center for Parkinson's Disease and Other Movement Disorders
Published Here
October 3, 2013
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