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Projected impact of polypill use among US adults: Medication use, cardiovascular risk reduction, and side effects

Muntner, Paul; Mann, Devin M.; Wildman, Rachel P.; Shimbo, Daichi; Fuster, Valentin; Woodward, Mark

Background
Polypills, which include multiple medications for reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in a single pill, have been proposed for population-wide use. The number of US adults eligible for polypills and potential benefits are unknown.

Methods
The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 were analyzed to estimate treatment rates for medications proposed for inclusion in polypills (aspirin, statin, an angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor, and a thiazide-type diuretic for those without and a β-blocker for those with a history of myocardial infarction) among US adults. The number of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke events potentially prevented through polypill use was projected by published meta-analyses and 3 large population-based cohort studies. Two polypill eligibility criteria were analyzed: (1) US adults ≥55 years and (2) US adults with a history of CVD.

Results
There are 67.6 million US adults ≥55 years and 15.4 million US adults with a history of CVD and, thus, eligible for polypills using the 2 outlined criteria. In 2007 to 2008, 37.3% of US adults ≥55 years and 57.0% of those with a history of CVD were taking statins. Use of other polypill medications was also low. Polypill use by US adults aged ≥55 years is projected to potentially prevent 3.2 million CHD events and 1.7 million strokes over 10 years. Among those with a history of CVD, the potential to prevent of 0.9 million CHD events and 0.5 million strokes is projected.

Conclusions
Polypills have the potential to lower CVD incidence substantially among US adults.

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Also Published In

Title
American Heart Journal
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2010.12.019

More About This Work

Academic Units
Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health
Publisher
Elsevier
Published Here
July 10, 2016
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