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Trends in Marijuana Use Among Pregnant and Nonpregnant Reproductive-Aged Women, 2002-2014

Brown, Qiana; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Martins, Silvia S.; Wall, Melanie M.; Hasin, Deborah S.

Between 2001 and 2013, marijuana use among US adults more than doubled, many states legalized marijuana use, and attitudes toward marijuana became more permissive. In aggregated 2007-2012 data, 3.9% of pregnant women and 7.6% of nonpregnant reproductive-aged women reported past-month marijuana use. Although the evidence is mixed, human and animal studies suggest that prenatal marijuana exposure may be associated with poor offspring outcomes (eg, low birth weight, impaired neurodevelopment). The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women and women contemplating pregnancy be screened for and discouraged from using marijuana and other substances. Whether marijuana use has changed over time among pregnant and nonpregnant reproductive-aged women is unknown.

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Also Published In

Title
Journal of the American Medical Association
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2016.17383

More About This Work

Academic Units
Epidemiology
Psychiatry
Published Here
April 19, 2017
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