HomeHome

Peace Mapping and Indigenous Peoples

Neil B. Keating

Title:
Peace Mapping and Indigenous Peoples
Author(s):
Keating, Neil B.
Date:
Type:
Chapters (layout features)
Department(s):
Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Persistent URL:
Book/Journal Title:
Indigenous Peoples' Rights and Unreported Struggles: Conflict and Peace
Book Author:
Stamatopoulou, Elsa
Notes:
This is a chapter from "Indigenous Peoples' Rights and Unreported Struggles: Conflict and Peace". The entire volume is available in Academic Commons at https://doi.org/10.7916/D82R5095.
Publisher:
Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University
Publisher Location:
New York
Abstract:
It appears to many scientists, activists and writers that our species has to adapt to the limits of ‘growth’ in order to survive. Such adaptation requires massive cultural change in order to positively resolve this social and ecological conflict, which includes new modes of attending to the reciprocity between peoples, and between people and the planet, in terms of wealth, resources and access. In this light, suggesting that states and Indigenous Peoples can evolve effective mechanisms of constructive conflict resolution is a relatively modest proposal. In this article, I describe what a 21st century science-based model of sustainable peace looks like, and examine how it could prove useful to the analysis and solution of conflicts between states and Indigenous Peoples. At the same time, I also recognize how current structures of power pose considerable obstacles to the achievement of sustainable peace with Indigenous Peoples.
Subject(s):
Human rights
Indigenous peoples
Peace
Peace-building
Item views
36
Metadata:
text | xml
Suggested Citation:
Neil B. Keating, , Peace Mapping and Indigenous Peoples, Columbia University Academic Commons, .

Columbia University Libraries | Policies | FAQ