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Must Biodiversity Hot-Spots Be Social Not-Spots? Win-Win Ecology as Sustainable Social Policy

Charles Geisler

Title:
Must Biodiversity Hot-Spots Be Social Not-Spots? Win-Win Ecology as Sustainable Social Policy
Author(s):
Geisler, Charles
Date:
Type:
Articles
Department(s):
Earth Institute
Persistent URL:
Book/Journal Title:
Consilience: The Journal of Sustainable Development
Abstract:
Reconciliation ecology, a family of socially inclusive conservation strategies that depart from traditional protected area management, is on trial. Skeptics find it problematic for a range of reasons, faulting it for lack of evidence and calling it a "bio-diversion" from the agenda of strict protected area expansion. The present paper has a dual agenda. Building on the work of Michael Rosenzweig and fortifying it with new information from different world regions, I write in support of re-embedding conservation in human-dominated landscapes. Simultaneously, I suggest that current protected areas yield conservation refugees, environmental backlash, and set-backs to sustainability efforts.
Subject(s):
National parks and reserves--Environmental aspects
Quaternary Geologic Period
Biodiversity conservation
Nature conservation
Sustainability
Ecology
Conservation biology
Item views
171
Metadata:
text | xml
Suggested Citation:
Charles Geisler, , Must Biodiversity Hot-Spots Be Social Not-Spots? Win-Win Ecology as Sustainable Social Policy, Columbia University Academic Commons, .

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