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The Problematic Nature of Using Western Treatments for PTSD in Non-Western Settings and a Discussion of Culturally Sensitive Interventions

Jenna Baldachin

Title:
The Problematic Nature of Using Western Treatments for PTSD in Non-Western Settings and a Discussion of Culturally Sensitive Interventions
Author(s):
Baldachin, Jenna
Date:
Type:
Undergraduate theses
Department:
Psychology (Barnard College)
Persistent URL:
Notes:
, Barnard College.
Abstract:
In recent years, American clinicians have sought to diagnose and treat individuals with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder around the world. Despite noble intentions, their faulty assumption that western treatments for trauma are universally applicable is highly problematic. Culture has an immeasurable impact on trauma that can range from differences in interpretations of traumatic events to symptoms of disordered behavior to societal norms about interventions. Most often, these issues become apparent in treatment settings, during which problems arise from the use of western methodology on non-western individuals. For this reason, some culturally sensitive psychotherapists have recognized the need for more culturally adjustable treatments and have adapted traditional western interventions for use with other populations. Recognizing the impact of ethnocultural factors on reactions to trauma and treatment is imperative if psychologists want to truly help individuals who are suffering from traumatic experiences around the world.
Subject(s):
Psychology
Item views
494
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Suggested Citation:
Jenna Baldachin, 2010, The Problematic Nature of Using Western Treatments for PTSD in Non-Western Settings and a Discussion of Culturally Sensitive Interventions, Columbia University Academic Commons, http://hdl.handle.net/10022/AC:P:10359.

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